Tag Archives | peek-a-boo

Cross-Training in Action (diary entry)

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02.01.19   The first two official private lessons of the year saw the uncle and nephew team train inter-discipline connections and principles. Trite, pseudo-philosophical paradoxes to one side, sometimes you do need to go back to the beginning in order to move forward. My junior client was taught the behavioural connection between peek-a-boo slip/punching and the “Dracula” guard, and my senior client was taught the behavioural connections between the fence, angling off in general and various cover tactics.   My […]

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Restricted Training & FLT (diary entry)

15.12.18   My two junior client’s second lesson looked at tightening up footwork and basic straight punching. One client is using the peek-a-boo guard and approach, whilst I am sticking with the high guard for the other one. Training moved along at a good pace with plenty of enthusiasm and evidence that both students have been training well.   We began mirror footwork, layering in upper body movement. We then focused on the jab, attacking, defending and countering. This was […]

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Peek-a-Boo & Muay Thai (diary entry)

peek-a-boo

10.09.18   Tonight’s family lesson consisted of half an hour peek-a-boo inspired Western Boxing for the junior client and advanced Muay Thai combinations for the senior client. Uncle and nephew did their own warm-up based on the fact that the uncle has been a client of mine since early 2014. This is a great way to keep the interest going outside of training time and in the family. I later had a report from the junior client’s mother that her […]

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Peek-a-Boo & the Art of Good Head Movement (diary entry)

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12.06.2018   The fourth hour of my client’s 5:30 a.m. sessions in Basic Western Boxing for Martial Arts Cross Training brought more emphasis on upper-body mobility. We spent a lot of time on the slip, coordinating it with footwork and the basic 1-2 combination. Then I introduced the peek-a-boo guard as well as bobbing and weaving.   The lesson began with mirror footwork. This teaches better dynamic movement when facing an opponent, anticipating and predicting actions as well as understanding […]

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